Don’t risk self-destruction, South Korea warns neighbour 

The government of South Korea has warned its North Korean counterpart against using its nuclear weapons, to avoid “self-destruction”. 

Did North Korea threaten to use its nukes? 

The tension between the two countries was aggravated last week as the North Korean parliament adopted legislation on the rules for the use of its nuclear arsenal. The legislation would allow the use of nuclear weapons if the country’s government faced an imminent attack or if it aims to prevent an unspecified “catastrophic crisis” for its people. Responding to the development, Seoul warned that North Korea would be putting itself on a “path of self-destruction” if it dares to use its nukes. 

Is Seoul contemplating an attack on North Korea? 

That’s not stated in the statement. South Korea’s Defense Ministry said North Korea’s new legislation would only further North Korea’s isolation and prompt a ‘further strengthening of deterrence and reaction capacities’ by South Korea and its ally, the United States of America. “We warn that the North Korean government would face the overwhelming response by the South Korea-U.S. military alliance and go on the path of self-destruction if it attempts to use nuclear weapons”, the ministry said through its acting spokesperson, Moon Hong Sik. 

What’s the U.S saying? 

While noting that Washington has no hostile intent toward North Korea, White House press secretary Karine Jean-Pierre said that the U.S “remains fully committed to the defense of (South Korea), using the full range of defense capabilities”. The U.S reiterated its focus on working closely with its allies to advance the shared objective of the complete denuclearization of the Korean Peninsula. North Korea has continued to draw attention as its leader Kim Jong Un insists that his country will never abandon its nuclear weapons as a result of U.S. threats. 

See also  Fleeing not due to cowardice